[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.145. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 4, 1915

SYPHILIS OF THE SPINE: ITS FREQUENCY AND THE VALUE OF ITS CHARACTERISTIC LESIONS AS A DIAGNOSTIC SIGN OF SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the University of California Medical School, with the aid of a grant from the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(23):1989-1994. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580230031010
Abstract

There is a general belief that syphilis of the joints is a rare disease. This is the more remarkable inasmuch as the various forms of syphilitic arthritis have been clearly enough described, not only in separate papers, but in textbooks as well. For example, Goldthwaite, Painter and Osgood1 include in their textbook an accurate description of the various lesions which may occur, and give references to literature, but add, as to frequency, that "there are great differences of opinion," and state of the toxic form (type of arthritis deformans): "This must be rare, we believe, in this country." On the other hand, many observers have believed that the incidence of joint lesions is high, especially in hereditary cases. Von Hippel asserts an incidence of 56 per cent., and Fournier of 40 per cent. O'Reilly2 contends that this disease is much commoner than is usually supposed.

With regard to

×