[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 5, 1911

AN EXPERIMENTAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE PRESENCE OF THE VIRUS OF MEASLES IN THE MIXED BUCCAL AND NASAL SECRETIONS

Author Affiliations

Hygienic Laboratory WASHINGTON, D. C.

From the Hygienic Laboratory, U. S. Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(6):476-478. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260080040012
Abstract

In our previous communications1 we have shown that the monkey (Macacus rhesus and Macacus cynomolgus) is susceptible to the infection of measles when inoculated with the blood obtained from a human case late in the preeruptive stage or within twenty-four hours after the first appearance of the eruption. Following such an inoculation,2 at least 50 per cent. of the animals react in a characteristic manner. After a variable incubation period of not less than five days there is a more or less marked rise in temperature with or without catarrhal symptoms referable to the respiratory passages, such as sneezing and cough, and with or without an exanthem.

About half the animals inoculated fail to present definitely recognizable symptoms. In other words, the disin the monkey is subject to great variation, the variations corresponding to those that have been described in the human subject and presenting in some respects

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×