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Article
August 12, 1911

HOW FAR MAY CONDITIONS IN THE NOSE AND THROAT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR MIDDLE-EAR DISEASES?

Author Affiliations

Professor of Rhinology and Laryngology, University of Minnesota MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1911;LVII(7):549-553. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260080113008
Abstract

I have confined myself to a discussion of the extent to which diseased conditions of the nose and throat are either directly or indirectly a factor in the production of diseases of the middle ear.

That involvement of the middle ear is, in a great majority of cases, due to a diseased condition of structures contiguous to the Eustachian tubes is a fact on which all otologists are agreed. It is not a question, then, as to whether diseases of the nose and throat may be responsible for ear involvement; that question was quite definitely settled by Wilhelm Meyer1 in 1870 when he published his paper on "Adenoid Vegetations in the Nasopharyngeal Cavity" and pointed out the effects of such growths in the causation of deafness. The questions at present are: To what extent are nasal and nasopharyngeal lesions responsible for deafness? What form of nasal and nasopharyngeal abnormalities

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