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Article
August 26, 1911

SENSIBILITY OF THE PERITONEUM AND ABDOMINAL VISCERA

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(9):709-712. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260080273004
Abstract

Although earlier writers, both physiologists and surgeons, made passing mention of the fact that certain parts of the peritoneum and abdominal viscera are more sensitive than others, Lennander,1 in 1901, first called attention forcibly to the fact that there is a distinct and constant contrast in the sensibility of the parietal and the visceral peritoneum. His first publication was elaborated by others until the time of his death. By an exhaustive and painstaking series of observations during operations, performed chiefly under local cocain anesthesia, he established the following facts: The parietal peritoneum is intensely sensitive to pain, but not to pressure, heat or cold. The abdominal viscera, on the other hand, possess no sense of pain. In other words, the visceral peritoneum and the abdominal organs, innervated only by the vagus or sympathetic nerves, are not sensitive to pain, and painful abdominal sensations are transmitted only by the phrenic,

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