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Article
August 26, 1911

THE INFLUENCE OF THE THYROID AND PARATHYROID GLANDS ON THE HEALING OF FRACTURES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Pathology, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(9):724-725. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260080288010
Abstract

Since skeletal disturbances are so striking a feature in athyreosis, it is easy to conceive that a fractured bone in an animal deprived of thyroid gland would suffer delay in healing. That this is true seemed to be proved by Steinlen in 1900, who, using young rabbits, observed a definite delay in the time of fracture healing in animal operated on. The same was explained as a result of the delay in callus formation and lack of calcium deposit, so that there was a persistence of uncalcified cartilage beyond the period when normal animals showed unmovable solid bone.

While the results of Steinlen seemed conclusive, they were attacked by Pezzolini (1903) who asserted that it was not the thyroid removal, but the general cachexia of the animal that retarded healing and regeneration.

Still more recently (1909) Canal, and also Morel, basing their assumptions on the theory of the relation of

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