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Article
September 2, 1911

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE SAFETY OF OPERATION FOR GOITER

Author Affiliations

ITHACA, N. Y.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(10):807-811. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260090029013
Abstract

No form of treatment for goiter has stood the test of years as has surgery since 1885, when Kocher reported the first considerable number of operations. Numerous patients treated for years by drugs, serums and other measures have later sought relief in surgery, and the number of enlightened internists who, like Osler, refer their patients for operation after three months' unavailing medical treatment is rapidly increasing. A further increase in the amount of goiter surgery will depend on our success in convincing the general practitioner and the patient of the safety of operation. A study of my recent methods with no mortality in 167 consecutive cases in comparison with earlier work, which was much less successful, may offer some suggestions to those interested in this subject.

EARLY OPERATION FOR SAFETY  As in many pathologic conditions, the safety of the patient may depend in large part on the early recognition and

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