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Article
September 30, 1911

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE QUANTITATIVE REGULATION OF THE DIET

JAMA. 1911;LVII(14):1119-1120. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260090341009
Abstract

It will generally be admitted that modern methods of infant-feeding have been of very great benefit. It is one of the very few accomplishments in dietetics that the profession may point to with pride. Yet it differs from the older methods of milk feeding chiefly in the fact that the nutritive ingredients of the milk are regulated quantitatively with greater accuracy.

Our grandmothers used to dilute cow's milk in giving it to infants. Their object was to make the milk "less were in reality lowering the percentage of protein, which in cow's milk is too high for infants. Then they sweetened it, apparently to make it more acceptable to the taste. But this also fulfilled the very desirable object of increasing the carbohydrates, which are low in cows's milk as compared with human milk. And further, if the baby did not gain in weight they used "richer" milk, that, is

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