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Article
September 30, 1911

THE THYROID WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HYPERTHYROIDISM AND A NEW METHOD OF TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Surgeon to Hope Hospital; Professor of Surgery in the Indiana University School of Medicine FORT WAYNE, IND.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(14):1120-1123. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260090342010

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Abstract

The surgical treatment of exophthalmic goiter is based on the hypothesis that the symptoms are due to hypersecretion, or hyperabsorption, or both. In the present state of knowledge concerning the chemistry of the secretion of the thyroid and other ductless glands, this is the best working hypothesis. It is probable, rather than possible, that in the near future we may have specific serums to counteract the various symptoms of thyroid disease, but until we know more than we do now, we can do no better than to work on the theory above given.

Ligation of one or more of the thyroid arteries has proved of benefit in some cases, but in the main the results have been disappointing. If one recalls the arterial supply to the thyroid, one ceases to wonder that this treatment has not proved satisfactory. Ligation of the common carotid does not affect the function of the

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