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Article
October 14, 1911

BUBONIC PLAGUE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THAT OF GROUND SQUIRREL ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

Passed Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service SAN FRANCISCO

From the Federal Laboratory, San Francisco.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(16):1268-1270. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260100094008
Abstract

Bubonic plague is a subject with which, fortunately, few of us have to deal. The practitioner in California, however, especially if his lot has been cast in the rural communities, must always keep the disease in mind when any acute febrile case comes under his observation. It is my intention to discuss only the isolated cases that occur in the country districts. Those that have been seen in San Francisco and in Oakland at various times between 1900 and 1908 were clearly associated with the presence of plague among rats, while the cases to which I particularly refer are associated with, and due to, the prevalence of the disease among ground squirrels (Citellus beecheyi). While plague in man when contracted from these animals is probably not essentially different from that derived from other sources, usually from rats, the cases that have come under observation are sufficient in number to justify

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