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Article
October 28, 1911

INFLUENCE OF SUMMER HEAT ON DIARRHEAL DISEASES

JAMA. 1911;LVII(18):1447-1450. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260100273013
Abstract

A first glance at infant-mortality tables demonstrates the fact that the greatest death-rate occurs from the gastro-intestinal diseases during summer. Dr. W. D. Booker, in the presidential address before the American Pediatric Society in 1901, reviewed the early literature on this subject. Dr. Booker says that the records show that in about the middle of the eighteenth century there occurred along the Atlantic coast of North America a serious disease characterized especially by vomitingand diarrhea and was confined almost exclusively to children in the first two years of life. Its incidence was limited almost to the summer months and it appeared each year in an epidemic form, with such regularity that it was looked for as an annual visitor. In 1777, Benjamin Rush read a paper entitled "An Inquiry Into the Cause and Care of Cholera Infantum." He gave a description of the stools, etiology and treatment of the disease.

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