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Article
November 11, 1911

ANESTHESIA, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO NITROUS OXID AND ITS SEQUENCES

Author Affiliations

First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, U. S. Army FORT SLOCUM, N. Y.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(20):1599-1601. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260110099007

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Abstract

It is desirable to call attention to two points of considerable importance in relation to anesthesia in general. The first of these is the need of all general anestheties being administered, as far as possible, by or under the supervision of trained anesthetists. There can be no reasonable doubt that a very large proportion of the mortality from postoperative conditions, as well as from the anesthetic per se, is due to the unskilled administration of these powerful drugs. In its report, the Anesthesia Commission of the American Medical Association calls particular attention to this in the following words:

From the statements set forth you will see something of the breadth and of the intricacy of the Present-day problem of anesthesia. It is a striking fact that all the newer methods demand expertness, experience, and special apparatus.

The surgeon, moreover, should be relieved from all anxiety concerning and responsibility for the anesthetic in order that he may devote his undivided attention to the work in hand.

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