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Article
November 11, 1911

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1911;LVII(20):1618-1620. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260110118021
Abstract

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1911 

CAN HAIR TURN WHITE IN A NIGHT?  A cherished popular belief is that of the sudden blanching of the hair from fright, worry or other severe mental strain. It plays its part in the drama and in fiction, while history records its famous instances. Who has not heard that Marie Antoinette's hair turned white during the night before her execution, or that the deeds and terrors of St. Bartholomew's night blanched the hair of Henry the Fourth? Most of us have wondered how the change could come about so rapidly as tradition relates; and yet so universal is the belief in this phenomenon that few have the hardihood to doubt it. One may accept one theory, that a sudden entrance of

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