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Article
November 18, 1911

EPIDEMIC POLIOMYELITIS: ELEVENTH NOTE: RELATION OF THE VIRUS TO THE TONSILS, BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID; RACES OF THE VIRUS

JAMA. 1911;LVII(21):1685-1686. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260110185012

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Abstract

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE VIRUS  The virus of poliomyelitis has been detected in very few instances outside the central nervous system, including the intervertebral ganglia (Flexner and Clark). of affected human beings and monkeys. Until within a few months, the only other site in which the virus had been demonstrated in human poliomyelitis was the mesenteric glands (Flexner and Lewis); and just recently it has been found in the tonsils and pharyngeal mucosa, but not in the cervical lymph-nodes or spleen, in another acutely fatal case (Levaditi and Pastia). The virus has been detected in a larger number of situations in monkeys experimentally infected. Besides the spinal cord and brain and the intervertebral ganglia (Flexner and Clark), it has been demonstrated in the nasal and pharyngeal mucosa (Flexner and Lewis, and others), regional lymph-nodes after a subcutaneous inoculation (Flexner and Lewis), mesenteric nodes (Römer and Joseph, Leiner and Wiesner), salivary glands

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