[Skip to Navigation]
Article
December 16, 1911

KORSAKOFF'S PSYCHOSIS AND THE AMNESIC SYMPTOMCOMPLEX: WITH A REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

STOCKTON, CAL.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(25):1974-1980. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260120164008
Abstract

Memory, as one of the mental faculties, varies with the endowment and degree of development in each individual human being. It reaches an acme of keenness at an age reputed to be about 40, after which it is said to be at a standstill, though some contend that it is even then undergoing a slow retrogression, recognizable in traces only for some decades, varying in different individuals and by no means always deserving Oslerism at the age of 60. Virchow's saying that one is as old as his arteries is perhaps the real criterion governing the state of one's memory as well as the state of youthfulness in general. The lapse of time is certainly not the deciding influence in all cases, as one meets with declining memory at the age of 50, and youthful memory at the age of 80. However, the majority of those arriving at the grand

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×