[Skip to Navigation]
Article
December 23, 1911

RABIES IN A HUMAN BEING, WITH POST-MORTEM

Author Affiliations

Senior Bacteriologist, State Board of Health Laboratories of Florida JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(26):2064-2068. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260120254013
Abstract

Since the introduction of the Pasteur treatment, deaths in human beings due to rabies are rare. It is a blot on public health legislation that they should occur at all. Of all the serious diseases, rabies is the most easily prevented, and yet, when symptoms are once manifest, death is certain. Proper support of health measures would make fatalities from rabies unnecessary.

By courtesy of Dr. R. L. May, of Jacksonville, I have the privilege of reporting the following case:

Patient.  —March 12, 1911, Dr. May was called to see a boy with severe throat symptoms and inability to swallow. It was at first thought that possibly this might be due to some of the commoner throat affections, probably diphtheria. On examining the throat, however, nothing definite was revealed and the forcible depression of the tongue during the examination seemed temporarily to enable the patient to swallow a bit of medicine

×