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Article
December 23, 1911

RECENT EXPERIENCES IN THE ARTIFICIAL FEEDING OF ONE HUNDRED INFANTS: DURING THE FIRST THREE MONTHS OF LIFE

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(26):2068-2071. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260120258014
Abstract

The experiences recorded in this paper were noted during the past year in the care of foundlings in a maternity home for unfortunate girls. No private cases are here included, so that my conclusions as to feedingresults are not so favorable as would be found in the handling of a similar number of cases in homes1. The material at hand included infants some of whom were fed at the start on breast-milk, but few of whom continued longer than two weeks. In many of these breastmilk cases the patients were wet-nursed and some fed on mixed milk drawn by the breast-pump. It would be almost impossible to trace any phenomena while the infant was on breat-milk to a cause in the milk or wetnurse, as the handling of the infants was entirely separate from that of the mothers or wet-nurse, about whom I knew nothing except that syphilis had been

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