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Article
December 30, 1911

THE WHITE CELLS IN TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

PHOENIX, ARIZ.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(27):2129-2131. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260120319012
Abstract

Study of the leukocytes in their relation to disease, or to a particular disease, soon impresses one with the truth of Professor Ehrlich's statement1 that the biologic variations of the white cells make them the most interesting study in pathology. Could we definitely know what the changes of the leukocytes are, at the onset and during the course of a disease, we would have an invaluable aid to the diagnosis and prognosis of that condition. Study of immunity and of the broad field of biologic adaptation in its application to pathology has revealed the white cells as the mobile tissue of the body, the elements most quickly adapting themselves to changes in environment by undeergoing endless variations in the presence of stimuli furnished by pathologic organisms and their toxins. Unfortunately, however, for clinical and therapeutic purposes, these variations are, as a rule, so similar in different diseases and so

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