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Article
July 1, 1905

THE TREATMENT OF TETANUS BY INTRANEURAL AND INTRASPINAL INJECTIONS OF ANTITOXIN.

Author Affiliations

Surgeon to Gouverneur Hospital, Assistant Surgeon to St. Francis' Hospital. NEW YORK.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(1):12-18. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510010012001c
Abstract

Some recent laboratory studies in the toxicology of tetanus seem to offer a little more hopeful therapy than has hitherto prevailed. To make the subject clear, it is necessary to review, briefly, what is known of the micro-organism, its poison and the natural antidote. The bacillus is anaërobic, and exposure to sunlight and air are inimical to it, but it can exist, at least in the spore state, for great lengths of time in every conceivable place contiguous to man and the domestic animals. The superficial layers of cultivated earth seem to be its favorite habitat, possibly because it is said to be a normal inhabitant of the intestine of the horse and has often been found in the feces of man and other animals; nevertheless, it is not generally considered normally a parasite. With such a distribution, the ingestion of the bacillus with raw vegetables and its inhalation in

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