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Article
January 13, 1912

A CASE OF PHENOL (CARBOLIC ACID) GANGRENE

Author Affiliations

EFFINGHAM, ILL.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(2):102-103. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260010104011
Abstract

Gangrene of the toes is occasionally caused by the application of weak solutions of phenol. The infrequency of this form of gangrene on other parts of the body is the reason for reporting the following case:

The patient, Mr. J. H. McC., aged 66, is a carriage manufacturer and a resident of St. Louis. Father died of cancer at 67; mother in confinement at 38. There is no other cancer history in the family. Patient is a very healthy-looking man, of good habits, looking much younger than age given, and weighs about 175 pounds. He has had eczema several times, but otherwise has never been sick.

Present trouble: About Aug. 1, 1911, while alighting from a railway train he slightly bruised and abraded the anterior surface of his right leg, just below the knee. Thinking it amounted to nothing at the time, he cleansed it with hydrogen peroxid and placed

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