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Article
January 13, 1912

HEMIATROPHY OF THE TONGUE WITH DEFECTIVE SPEECH

Author Affiliations

Associate in Psychiatry at Columbia University NEW YORK

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(2):103. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260010105012
Abstract

Patient.  —A girl, J. M., aged 15, was brought to the Vanderbilt Clinic on account of her defective speech. There was also a suspicion that her intelligence was not fully normal. The patient's birth was normal. She was the third of five children, all the others being normal. At 6 weeks old she had had whooping-cough, with two severe spasms, lasting for five minutes. She had had abscesses three times on the left side of her neck at 1½, 3 and 10 years of age.

Examination.  —Her speech was very indistinct, owing to her inability to enunciate properly the sounds of t, d, s, sh. Her facial expression was dull and sad. She was unresponsive and very timid. There was marked atrophy of the right side of the tongue with fibrillary twitchings. On protrusion the tongue deviated to the right, as shown in the illustration. The movements of the tongue

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