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Article
January 13, 1912

EPIDEMIC POLIOMYELITIS: TWELFTH NOTE: THE VISCERAL LESIONS OF HUMAN CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(2):109-111. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260010111018
Abstract

Epidemic poliomyelitis has been viewed as a disease of the central nervous system in which general visceral lesions, if present, are inconspicuous and unimportant. The demonstration of the specific nature of the infection revives the question whether, after all, the significant attendant lesions are confined to the nervous organs. Accurate histologic studies of the disease in human beings and monkeys have shown that the lesions in the nervous system are widely spread and affect the spinal cord, intervertebral ganglia, medulla, pons, cerebellum, cerebrum, and meninges, and both the gray and the white matter of the spinal cord and brain are subject to injury. It is not surprising, therefore, to find that general visceral lesions are present in fatal human cases.

During the past summer the organs from eleven children, ranging in age from 3½ months to 9½ years, became available for study. Of the eleven children, ten died on the

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