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Article
February 3, 1912

RELATIONSHIP OF DRUG ADDICTIONS, PARTICULARLY ALCOHOLISM, TO NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES

Author Affiliations

Physician in Charge, Department for Inebriety and Other Drug Addictions, and Assistant in Psychiatry, St. Francis Hospital PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(5):322-325. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260020006002
Abstract

Drug addiction is frequently associated with lesions of the cerebrospinal system as cause or effect. It is comparatively simple to recognize many of the pathologic conditions resulting from drug addiction; but it is difficult to clear up the obscure etiology usually lying back of the addiction itself. Outside of cases manifestly artificially induced. it is rare to find an instance of drug habit which is not engrafted on underlying neuropathologic soil. Among artificially induced cases may be cited those of persons who have blundered into the habit through taking alcohol as a tonic, or as a hypnotic, or as a sedative in dysmenorrhea, or through the use of morphin to relieve pain such as that incident on gall-stone colic or neuralgia. In this class also are those cases induced through social customs and prejudices, such as the custom of treating; that of giving young children alcoholic beverages in the belief

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