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Article
February 3, 1912

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS PRESENTED BY THOSE ADDICTED TO COCAIN: OBSERVATIONS IN A SERIES OF TWENTY-THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

Passed Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Navy NEWPORT, R. I.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(5):329-330. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260020013004
Abstract

The individual who is under the influence of a nontoxic amount of cocain, or its synthetic substitutes, experiences a sense of elation associated with increased mental and physical vigor. There exists a feeling of physical beatitude and exquisite pleasure. One seems to be in an atmosphere of new life where worries are unknown and all is a delightful calm. M. Montegazza, who had experimented with himself by administering a considerable quantity of the drug, exclaimed to his friends when sufficiently recovered that "God was unjust in that he made man to live without eating coca." "I prefer a life of ten years of coca to one of one thousand years without it." The brain and muscular system are extraordinarily stimulated, and one may accomplish tests of physical endurance which under ordinary conditions would be impossible. From the days of the Incas, the natives of Western South America have eaten the

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