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Article
February 3, 1912

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(5):344-349. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260020028015
Abstract

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1912 

ALTITUDE AND BLOOD-CORPUSCLES  The response of tlie human organism to altitude, as exemplified in an increase in the number of red blood-cells (erythrocytes) in the circulation, is familiarly pointed out as a useful compensatory reaction. The cll'ect of a diminished partial pressure of oxygen accompanying the rarefaction of Ihe atmosphere is equalized by (lie linger ahsorliing surface furnished by the increased nuniher of oxygen-carrying cells. The facts here cited have played a part in the attempt to explain the physiologic effects of mountain resorts and elevated plateaus; and various Iherapeiilic gains have lieen ascribed to them. The published statistics for the

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