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Article
February 10, 1912

NITROUS OXID AND OXYGEN ANESTHESIA IN MAJOR SURGERY

Author Affiliations

Consulting Anesthetist to the Massachusetts General Hospital and Children's Hospital BOSTON

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(6):395-397. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260020079003
Abstract

So much has been written lately in favor of gas and oxygen anesthesia that I feel called on to state in the beginning that I am in no way trying to discredit a method which I am using constantly and increasingly both in hospital and private practice, but merely to arrive at sonic conclusion as to its safety and freedom from after-effects in major surgery as distinguished from minor surgery and dentistry. By major surgery I mean, in a general way, serious operations lasting from, say, thirty-five minutes to two hours. It is on such cases that my experience with gas and oxygen is based. Examples are goiter extirpations, appendectomies, cholecystotomies, intestinal anastomoses, decortication of the kidneys, nephrectomies, prostatectomies, hysterectomies, etc.; operations which require prolonged anesthesia and in which the respiration under gas and oxygen undergoes marked reflex changes.

Most writers on this subject make the unqualified general statement that

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