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Article
February 17, 1912

CESAREAN SECTION PERFORMED BECAUSE OF DYSTOCIA FROM VENTRAL FIXATION OF THE UTERUS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Obstetrics, Indiana University School of Medicine INDIANAPOLIS

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(7):476-477. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260020160013
Abstract

Cases of dystocia due to operations for relief of versions of the uterus have increased in number during the last few years. Ventrofixation and suspension are the chief causes, the latter seldom, if ever, leading to serious complications. In rare instances, suspension of the organ has terminated in a fixation due to adhesion of the fundus to the abdominal wall. These adhesions arc traced to infections and abrasions of the serous coat during the operation, resulting in a firm adhesion of the uterus to the abdominal wall that prevents the freedom of expansion and mobility necessary in the pregnant uterus. The abdominal fixation of the pregnant uterus often results in uterine inertia, tetanic contractions and obstructive labor. The anterior wall of the uterus below the point of fixation becomes thickened and hypertrophied until it feels like a fibroid growth. This is due to the failure of this portion to expand

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