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Article
February 17, 1912

DIRECT TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD IN ACUTE HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE

Author Affiliations

YORKVILLE, ILL.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(7):478. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260020162015

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Abstract

Patient.  —S., male, aged 19 months. Family history entirely negative as to hemophiliac or other hemorrhagic tendencies; no discoverable syphilis; one paternal aunt died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Father, mother and one older brother healthy.

Examination.  —The patient was a well-developed, well-nourished child. No rickets, no scurvy, or other constitutional dyscrasia. He had always been well except for an ordinary attack measles from which he had recovered three weeks previously. Without apparent cause slow, continuous, uncontrollable epistaxis first appeared. The nares were unsuccessfully packed with adrenalin (epinephrin) tape. Twenty-four hours later hematuria, melena, hematemesis and hemoptysis appeared. These were accompanied by innumerable petechiæ of skin and all visible mucous membranes, which were small, varying from pin-point to split-pea in size, most numerous on forearms and legs. There were large ecchymoses under eyes. Temperature was 100 F., pulse 190, blood-pressure 70 Hg (Faught). The child was in a very critical condition.

Treatment 

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