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Article
December 22, 1894

AN INSTRUCTIVE CASE OF APPENDICITIS NECESSITATING AN UNUSUAL METHOD OF OPERATION.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK, N. Y.

JAMA. 1894;XXIII(25):928-929. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02421300002001a

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Abstract

On Sept. 29, 1894, I saw, in consultation with Dr. Herriman, of Long Island City, New York, a young lady, 16 years of age, who, from the history given me at the time, evidently had an attack of appendicitis beginning ten days before this time. There was a large well-recognized tumor in the right iliac fossa, and although deeply seated, fluctuation was evident by palpation through the abdominal wall and the intervening viscera.

Operation was advised, and undertaken at once. The anesthetic used was chloroform. Upon opening into the peritoneal cavity through the usual incision, a large mass was discovered, in no place adherent to the abdominal wall. It was evidently an abscess due to perforation of the appendix, the walls of this abscess being made up of plastic lymph thrown out in advance of the inflammatory process, and agglutination of the neighboring intestines.

I recognized that any attempt at

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