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Article
March 2, 1912

ACETONURIA AND THE RELATION OF ACETONE TO "ACID INTOXICATION"

Author Affiliations

Pathologist for Hope Hospital FORT WAYNE, IND.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(9):628-632. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030028011
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to report progress on some investigations regarding the nature of acetone and of its relative importance in the symptom-complex known as "acid intoxication." The present conception of this condition is that the toxemia is due to the acid qualities of the acetone bodies, and that the acids, namely, diacetic and beta-oxybutyric acids, although not in themselves toxic, produce a condition of toxemia by uniting with the fixed alkalies of the blood. The blood no longer being able to extract the poisonous carbon dioxid, the subject succumbs to "internal suffocation" from its accumulation in the tissues, the acids being excreted as ammonia compounds, resulting in a larger excretion of ammonia and a consequent diminution of urea.

Ewing1 reports a study of acid poisoning by injecting intravenously eighth-normal to fourth-normal hydrochloric acid into rabbits. He found that they could stand large quantities of acids slowly

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