[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 19, 1895

CASE OF FRACTURE OF ANATOMIC NECK OF THE HUMERUS.

Author Affiliations

STAUNTON, VA.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(3):79. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430030009001d

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

A 16-year-old boy, of good build, fell about twenty feet into some ladders. I saw him about two hours after the injury; he complained of great pain at the shoulder joint. A slight contusion was seen on the front of the arm at the shoulder joint; I was unable to find any other contusion.

On superficial examination, I thought I had a subspinous dislocation; but the protrusion did not look as large as would be expected. To isolate fracture, I placed the fingers of one hand on the bicipital tuberosities and rotated the humerus; they were felt to move under my fingers; no crepitation was elicited in this way. Dr. J. St. P. Gibson saw him at this time and confirmed my diagnosis. He was given chloroform; reduction was effected by Koker's method after several trials. Rotation was now made and crepitation was very perceptible.

Treatment: Gibson's wire splint, which

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×