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Article
March 23, 1912

A CASE OF SPORADIC CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS SIMULATING THE UREMIA OF BRIGHT'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine, Indiana University; Physician-in-Chief to Hope Hospital FORT WAYNE, IND.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(12):849-850. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030247009

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Abstract

While the occurrence of sporadic cases of cerebrospinal meningitis is generally recognized as a possibility, it probably occurs more frequently than is commonly supposed. It is perhaps true, as Preble has said, that many of the cases which have been so reported are not genuine, but it is quite likely true that many genuine cases pass unrecognized. There is no longer any reason that the diagnosis should remain in doubt. It can be either established or refuted with perfect confidence by suitable bacteriologic examinations of the spinal fluid and blood. That the epidemic form is always due to an infection by the Diplococcus intracellularis meningitidis, and that the only cases which should be called sporadic cerebrospinal fever are due to the same organism, are two propositions which appear fully established. Wollstein, e. g., produced fatal meningitis in monkeys indifferently with organisms derived from these sources. Furthermore, the organism appears to

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