[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.239.151.158. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 2, 1895

INTESTINAL INDIGESTION.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE, FORT WAYNE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. FORT WAYNE, IND.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(5):158-161. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430050010001b

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

To treat of intestinal indigestion separately from gastric indigestion would seem almost impossible, since it can not well be conceived how the former can exist without being a sequence of the latter, as gastric indigestion invariably precedes intestinal indigestion and is therefore always a factor which mingles its phenomena with all that which follows in its wake.

If proteolysis is not finished in the stomach and duodenum, the substances which have not run the gamut of complete proteolytic disintegration must pass the remaining intestinal length untouched, or undergo putrefactive changes at the instance of bacteria which provide the necessary elements, and hence, abnormal and deleterious substances arise which to a greater or less extent furnish fuel for general systematic disturbances. Intestinal putrefaction is then in its incipient stages, not due to a pathologic condition of the tube below the stomach and duodenum, but is dependent solely upon errors of gastric

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×