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Article
March 30, 1912

ACUTE LYMPHATIC LEUKEMIA: REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

BISMARCK, N. D.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(13):935-936. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030333015
Abstract

Leukemia, from the Greekleukos, white and haima, blood, meaning white blood, is a disease of undetermined cause, characterized by a marked anemia, an increase in the leukocytes, a decided decrease in the red blood-cells and hemoglobin, and lesions in the spleen, lymph-nodes or bone-marrow. Clinically we are able to recognize two distinct varieties: the splenomedullary and the lymphatic type. Splenomedullary leukemia manifests itself by an enlarged spleen and an increase in the polymorphonuclear or granular elements of the blood, together with the presence of a large percentage of myelocytes; while in lymphatic leukemia there is enlargement of the lymph-nodes and an increase in the lymphocytes or nongranular cells. The former is the most common and occurs most frequently in adult life, between the ages of 20 and 40. Enlargement of the spleen is usually the most conspicuous phenomenon and the latter may extend entirely across the abdomen. The lymphatic

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