[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 6, 1912

AN EMERGENCY CANNULA: TRANSFUSION IN A THIRTY-SIX-HOUR OLD BABY SUFFERING FROM MELENA NEONATORUM

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Surgery, Johns Hopkins University BALTIMORE

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(14):1007-1008. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260040023010
Abstract

Jan. 1, 1912, I was called to transfuse a baby, 36 hours old, suffering from melena neonatorum. Following a very short and spontaneous labor the boy, who weighed 8½ pounds, had progressed nicely for ten hours, with several passages of meconium, when suddenly at 10:30 a. m. there was a large stool consisting almost entirely of bright red blood. From that time until 9:30 p. m. he passed considerably quantities of blood, at intervals of about every three hours. There had been no vomiting or apparent pain. He had retained a little mother's milk and water, to which had been added some calcium lactate.

While Drs. J. Whitridge Williams, Richard Follis and J. Mason Knox were discussing the advisability of transfusion, the baby had two more stools of this same bright red, practically unclotted blood. lie looked colorless, his breathing was labored, while the pulse at the wrist was almost

×