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Article
April 6, 1912

ACUTE ARTICULAR RHEUMATISM TREATED BY THE RECTAL ADMINISTRATION OF SODIUM SALICYLATE

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(14):1013-1014. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260040029017
Abstract

This report aims to call attention to a therapeutic measure, which has perhaps not received the consideration which it apparently deserves. Sodium salicylate may be justly designated as a specific in acute rheumatism. We know that the salicylic acid group of substances is bactericidal, and in rheumatism is probably etiotropic, i. e., acting on the cause of the disease. If we consider these facts, it would seem advisable to administer the largest dose possible early, as in the serum therapy of diphtheria. Heretofore, we have been satisfied in most cases with results obtained by the administration of the drug by mouth. But certain cases are refractory and it is possible that a delay in the cure of the infection increases the liability to the unfortunate cardiac complications. In many cases the stomach does not tolerate this drug, owing perhaps to the quantity of irritating salicylic acid set free; in these

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