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August 19, 1905

THE INFLUENCE OF THE PRIVATE PHYSICIAN ON MEDICAL EDUCATION.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(8):537-539. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02510080035007

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Abstract

The private practitioner, wherever located, is often likely to feel merely a remote interest in the great subject of medical education. He finished his own undergraduate medical education perhaps years ago, secured his license to practice, and, occupied each day with his own work, he begins to feel more or less instinctively that the circle of his immediate influence is getting to be well defined. More or less remote from the medical centers, he finds that there is little occasion for him to take any concern in the welfare and progress of the numerous institutions that are carrying on the actual work of training the coming generations of medical men. The methods and machinery of medical study even in his own college are now widely different from these in vogue when he "sat on the benches"; the requirements are different, the annual announcements, of which a number reach him each

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