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Article
August 26, 1905

UNILATERAL TRANSITORY PARALYSIS OF THE ABDUCENS.WITH REPORT OF CASES.

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(9):606-607. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510090028001f
Abstract

Paralysis of the sixth nerve occurs with comparative frequency in ophthalmic practice. It may be unilateral or bilateral alone or associated with lesions of other ocular nerves. The causes may be many, including syphilis, congenital or other traumatism, diabetes, central lesions, etc. One etiologic factor, however, has heretofore been questionable and has created considerable controversy; that is, hysteria. Some doubt the existence of a hysterical abducens paralysis, and Möbius1 denies the existence of hysterical paralysis of the eye muscles at all, and ascribes such paralyses to traumatism; and considers, he states, the "apparent" abducens paralysis to be a spasm of the internal recti. On this point, however, I think we have indisputable proof, as evidenced by cases reported by such authorities as Leber, Parinaud, Nonne and Beselin, Guttman, Duchesne, Roder and Wilbrand.

Within the past twelve months there have come under my observation four cases of unilateral abducens paralysis, which

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