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August 26, 1905

ANTISTREPTOCOCCUS SERUM IN THE TREATMENT OF SCARLET FEVER.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(9):633. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.02510090055005
Abstract

Ever since the first careful bacteriologic studies of scarlet fever were made, it has been recognized that streptococci are almost constantly associated with this disease. The earlier investigations were made on the bacteriology of the throats and of the internal organs and bone marrow in fatal cases. Streptococci were found in a large percentage of these throats and organs, but the investigators regarded the invasion by these organisms as of a secondary nature and not as an essential part of the disease. More recently, blood cultures have shown that these organisms can be cultivated from the blood during life in only a small percentage of cases—12 per cent, in Hektoen's series of 100 cases. Baginsky and Sommerfeld, however, found streptococci in all the organs in every one of 82 cases which they examined postmortem. Some of these patients had died during the first days of the disease before there were

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