[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 20, 1912

ORCHITIS SECONDARY TO TONSILLITIS TREATED WITH HEXAMETHYLENAMIN: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

BELLOWS FALLS, VT.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(16):1192-1193. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260040208010
Abstract

The therapeutic uses of hexamethylenamin have multiplied rapidly since its introduction into medicine by Nicolaier,1 in 1894, and his demonstration of its excretion in the urine, in 1899. The well-known researches of Crowe,2 in 1908 and 1909, showed that after administration of the drug by mouth it appeared in the bile, pancreatic juice, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, saliva, milk, pleural exudate and circulating blood. In 1910, Barton3 reported that hexamethylenamin is eliminated by the mucous membrane of the middle ear. Following this announcement Brown4 was quick to draw the inference that it should also be eliminated through the mucous membrane of the nasal sinuses, and Heitmuller5 demonstrated that it is eliminated by the bronchial mucous membrane. A year later, Armstrong and Goodman6 found that "hexamethylenamin, when given by mouth, is excreted in the sputum of tuberculosis, pneumonia, bronchitis and asthma." From these facts Nicolaier,1

×