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Article
March 9, 1895

THE EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF CARCINOMA OF THE STOMACH, WITH THE BACTERIOLOGY OF THE STOMACH CONTENTS.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE STOMACH AND INTESTINES, POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL; ATTENDING PHYSICIAN TO THE COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(10):346-347. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430100006001a

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Abstract

After the study of sixteen cases Rosenheim (Berl. Klin. Woch., Dec. 24, 1888) concluded that the chemic insufficiency of the stomach in carcinoma ventriculi is not due to the cancer itself, but to the attending atrophy. He divided the pathologic changes into three stages: inflammatory, interstitial and atrophic; adding that these stages may be present at the same time; and Ewald (Berl. Klin. Woch., Dec. 3, 1888) holds that the disappearance of HCl is not due to carcinoma directly, but is merely a disturbance of the functions of the secretory glands.

The post-mortem changes often veil the pathologic changes, unless well marked and permanent lesions occur. It is best, if possible, to secure specimens during an operation for carcinoma of the stomach as far remote from the tumor as possible. In three operations I secured several sections—one for carcinoma planum (anterior wall) where a large area was removed, leaving a border

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