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Article
March 9, 1895

SCARLATINA AND THE STREPTOCOCCUS INFECTION.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN IN THE POST-GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF CHICAGO; ATTENDING PEDIATRIST TO THE UNITED HEBREW CHARITIES FREE DISPENSARY. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(10):353-355. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430100013001e
Abstract

The clinical history and symptomatology of scarlatina point to a virulent infection. Streptococci are found in the throat, cervical glands and other lymphoid structures, as well as in the blood, pleural, pericardial and peritoneal secretions, internal organs and skin of patients succumbing to this dread disease.

Mr. Bergé, in a paper read at a recent meeting of the Biological Society of Paris, maintains that scarlet fever is the result of a local infection by the streptococcus. In an article upon "The Local Lesion of Scarlet Fever," Dowson speaks of the "accidental inoculation of the tonsil by minute scratches while taking food."

No one questions the common etiology of idiopathic and surgical scarlatina. Their relation to puerperal fever and pelvic suppuration is admitted. Consequently their affinity to any local abscess formation, septicemia or pyemia must be conceded. No clinician has failed to observe the likeness of the course and progress of

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