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Article
March 23, 1895

LECTURES ON INTRACRANIAL SURGERY.I.—MENINGEAL HEMORRHAGE AND ITS SURGICAL TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS. MO.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(12):425-427. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430120001001

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Abstract

Since Macewen, in 1879, opened the skull of a boy and removed two ounces of fluid and coagulated blood from beneath the dura in the lower part of the Rolandic area, with recovery, operations for meningeal hemorrhage have been too numerous and the results too brilliant to admit of discussion of the propriety of operative procedures whenever the site of bleeding is accessible. All progressive surgeons now agree with this statement, basing their opinion upon such statistics as those of Weisemann (Deutsche Zeitschrift für Chirurgie, 1885) which give 147 cases treated by the expectant plan, with 131 deaths and only 16 recoveries—a mortality of more than 89 per cent.—while 110 cases subjected to operation gave 30 deaths and 80 recoveries, a reduction of the death rate to about 27 per cent. This position assumed by operative surgeons is further strengthened by the fact that not a single death has ever

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