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Article
September 9, 1905

THE VALUE OF VARIOUS FORMS OF HEMOGLOBINOMETERS TO THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER

JAMA. 1905;XLV(11):769-771. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510110025001d
Abstract

We have undertaken this study because the general practitioner as a rule looks on hemoglobin instruments in general as a sort of medical toy, to be used largely by the consultant, and because we believe that the use of these instruments is practicable and that it does not take more time, nor nearly as much time with some forms, as is wasted over every patient by each of us.

In 1899 one of us read a paper before the Pennsylvania Medical Society in which the following points were noted:

  1. The necessity of blood instruments becoming part of the equipment of every practitioner.

  2. The value of various blood examinations as pointing out the true diagnosis and treatment in many cases.

  3. The fact that blood examinations done in a routine manner do not take more time than is constantly wasted in gossip with each patient.

We believe these points were well taken

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