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Article
October 24, 1903

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CENTRAL SULCUS OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX FOR LOCALIZATION.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(17):1030. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.02490360032008

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Abstract

Opinion has swung to and fro for a long time as to the relation in which the cerebral sulci, and especially the central sulci of Rolandi of the two sides, stands to the localization of function in the cerebral cortex. The early view that functional areas are sharply marked off from one another by the various sulci gradually gave way before the doctrine that the sulci and gyri are of morphologic interest only and possess no delimiting functional significance whatever. Recent experiments made on motor localization in the cortex indicate, however, that at least for the sulcus centralis in the anthropoid apes, a very sharp localizing significance is maintainable. Sherrington has shown that if the animals be examined under precautions greater than those hitherto taken, no motor response can be elicited by stimulation behind the central sulci, all the cortical motor innervations apparently starting out from the anterior central gyrus

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