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Article
June 1, 1912

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(22):1686-1691. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260060035017
Abstract

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SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1912 

EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTHYROIDISM  The pathologic condition variously designated as Graves' disease, Basedow's disease, or exophthalmic goiter is characterized by certain familiar symptoms which are readily recognized in man. Most conspicuous among these are tachycardia, disturbances of the nervous system characterized by hyperexcitability and exophthalmos, disturbances of the digestive tract accompanied by diarrhea and occasional hemorrhage, and, finally, perversions of nutrition manifested in rapid emaciation, sometimes attended with febrile changes, glycosuria and comparable phenomena. For some time these symptomcomplexes in man have been ascribed to a condition of hyperthyroidism; and the overfunctioning of the thyroid has been made responsible for the appearance of the manifestations described.When the evidence for the validity of the hypersecretion hypothesis is critically examined, the current explanation of

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