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Article
April 27, 1895

LECTURES ON INTRACRANIAL SURGERY.VI—BRAIN TUMOR AND ITS SURGICAL TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS. MO.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(17):613-616. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430170001001
Abstract

Continuing the discussion of brain tumor and its surgical treatment, I will first speak of the

Symptoms of Cerebellar Tumor.  —Tumor of the cerebellum may give rise to no characteristic symptoms whatever. Loomis has reported a case in which there was simply a low grade of fever; yet the post-mortem examination revealed a cerebellar tumor as large as an orange. Commonly, however, there are marked symptoms—sometimes so pronounced as to make localization absolutely certain: vomiting with occipital headache and general failure of health, without other discoverable cause, will almost certainly call attention to the proper region; besides, as the tumor grows, pressure symptoms arise. They are thus enumerated by Wood: "Encroachment on the medulla may lead to imperfect hemiplegia or even to great motor failure; or hypoglossal, or facial, or other local paralysis may result from the pressure exerted by the enlarged cerebellar hemisphere upon nerve trunks. If the trigeminus

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