[Skip to Navigation]
Article
June 29, 1912

INTESTINAL IMPLANTATION OF THE BACILLUS LACTIS BULGARICUS IN CERTAIN INTESTINAL CONDITIONS OF INFANTS, WITH REPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

Assistant Physician to the Out-Patient Department of the Babies' Hospital of the City of New York and St. Mary's Free Hospital for Children, New York City; Clinical Assistant Obstetrician to the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(26):2017-2021. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260060370005
Abstract

Buttermilk has been widely used in infant-feeding because its chemical composition was supposed to be adapted to certain abnormalities of digestion and metabolism; but the results obtained from its use have been variable, since buttermilk is not always adapted to the caloric needs of the infant.

A few years ago, I reported1 a series of cases in which buttermilk was used as a dietetic treatment for malnutrition, enteritis, enterocolitis, etc., and many similar cases have been reported by various writers from time to time. While the prostration and toxic symptoms were usually lessened under this regimen, some infants fared badly on the diet, so that the dietetic treatment was usually supplemented by medicinal methods; hence, any improvement in the condition could not be attributed solely to the presence of lactic acid bacilli in the milk. Moreover, the buttermilk was sometimes boiled in the process of making the feeding mixtures,

×