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Article
October 7, 1905

A CASE OF CEPHALIC TETANUS, WITH PARALYSIS OF BOTH SEVENTH NERVES.

Author Affiliations

Neurologist to the Philadelphia Hospital PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(15):1072-1075. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510150036002h
Abstract

In 1870, Rose1 described a rare form of tetanus in which the tetanic symptoms were sometimes (but not always) confined to the muscles of the jaw and throat and were associated with a paralysis of the seventh nerve. This paralysis of the seventh nerve may be said to be the most distinguishing symptom of this form of lockjaw, and the cases thus far reported have, without exception, arisen from wounds in the territory of the fifth nerve.

Although paralysis of the seventh nerve is the most characteristic symptom, this nerve is not the only one paralyzed in all cases, for in very few instances the motor nerves of the eye, the hypoglossal nerve, and the branches of the pneumogastric nerve supplying the muscles of the pharynx, have also been involved. Such an anomaly as these local palsies present in cases of lockjaw could not fail in time to attract

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