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Article
May 18, 1895

ADDRESS ON GENERAL MEDICINE. THE MALARIAL DISORDERS OF LARGE CITIES, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO CHICAGO.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OF CHICAGO AND PRESIDENT OF THE FACULTY; PRESIDENT ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, ETC. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(20):737-741. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430200001001

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Abstract

It is a fact of familiar observation and comment that irregular cases of malarial disorder are occasionally met with at all seasons of the year and in all localities. It is equally well known that the conditions existing in large cities are inimical to the production of the malarial poison. The busiest metropolitan physician sees very few examples of frank periodical malarial fever that unquestionably originated in paved and sewered portions of his city. The rare cases that do occur are accounted for upon the assumption of "limited foci " of infection. If an excavation for building purposes is found in the neighborhood, no matter what the season of the year, it is readily assumed that the upturning of the soil is the cause of the patient's sickness. Or, if the individual has been out of the city, at any time within a period of a year or two, it is

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