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Article
May 25, 1895

CHRONIC INEBRIETY—FROM A MEDICOLEGAL POINT OF VIEW.

Author Affiliations

SUPERINTENDENT WALNUT LODGE HOSPITAL, HARTFORD, CONN.

JAMA. 1895;XXIV(21):791-795. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430210013003a

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Abstract

The chronic inebriate appears most frequently in the lower courts charged with crime against persons, and also minor grades of crime against property. He is commonly a continuous drinker, taking spirits daily, and to excess, when he has the means to procure it, and the conditions are favorable; or a periodic drinker with distinct drink paroxysms, at uncertain or definite free intervals. The paroxysms subside usually from exhaustion, and begin again when a degree of restoration comes on. Such persons are more commonly laborers, mechanics, barkeepers, boatmen, hostlers, and others of servile occupations. A certain number have descended from higher levels of business and social life, and a certain percentage are wrecks from various disasters; but the larger proportion are degenerates from inheritance, and have never been able to rise above the present levels. In appearance an irregular shaped head, face and body are often prominent. Often they are of

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